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Tuesday, January 10, 2012

New form of graphene could prevent electronics from overheating and revolutionize thermal management

A new form of graphene created by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin could prevent laptops and other electronics from overheating, ultimately, overcoming one of the largest hurdles to building smaller and more powerful electronic devices.

The research team, which includes colleagues at The University of Texas at Dallas, the University of California-Riverside and Xiamen University in China, published its findings online today in the Advance Online Publication of Nature Materials. The study will also appear in the print journal of Nature Materials.

Led by Professor Rodney S. Ruoff in the Cockrell School's Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Materials Science and Engineering Program, the research demonstrates for the first time that a type of graphene created by the University of Texas researchers is 60 percent more effective at managing and transferring heat than normal graphene.

"This demonstration brings graphene a step closer to being used as a conductor for managing heat in a variety of devices. The potential of this material, and its promise for the electronic industry, is very exciting," said Ruoff, a physical chemist and Cockrell Regents Family Chair, who has pioneered research on graphene-based materials for more than 12 years.

The findings could have a significant impact on the future development of semiconductor electronics. As silicon transistors - foundations of modern-day electronics - are built smaller and faster, more effective heat removal techniques are needed to remove heat dissipated by the transistors as they operate. The latter has become a crucial issue for the electronics industry – one that has spurred a scientific race to develop and find materials more efficient at conducting heat than the materials currently used.




New form of graphene could prevent electronics from overheating and revolutionize thermal management

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