Follow by Email

Saturday, December 10, 2011

Rule 34...

Warning: This Article discusses matters that are NOT SAFE FOR WORK, and possibly something young children should not be exposed to...
34. There is porn of it. No exceptions.
35. If no porn is found of it, it will be created.
Rules of the Internet
 I suppose my first exposure to pornography happened when I was very young... A girl from my neighborhood found an old copy of either Playboy or Penthouse that had been badly tattered.. I don't remember being terribly interested, at the time, as I was too young to even be curious about sex...
A few years later, while rummaging about in some of my father's things, I found an old calendar with the picture of the upper torso of a comely young red head. I was infatuated with how lovely and mysterious she looked...
In my teens, as my family was on an annual visit with my mother's family, we were staying in a motel in Brunswick, ME. One day, for some reason, I had stayed behind in the motel room while the rest of my family was out and about.. Bored, I rummaged through the room, finding the inevitable Gideon's Bible, a pad of letter paper, and otherwise empty drawers... I don't know what prompted me to check underneath the drawers of the nightstand (perhaps it stuck for some reason, or I suspected something...), but I found an issue of Penthouse that I confiscated, kept secret, and pored over all that summer.. I was as equally fascinated with the centerfold as I was amused  by the Penthouse Forum letters (which is when I first learned washing machines could be used as vibrators...).
Upon reaching the age of eighteen, I decided that I needed a subscription to Playboy, and not for the articles. Though, I will admit, when I ran out of reading materials, turning to the interviews and articles in those books kept me sane in my addiction to the printed word. This was the 1980s, and the time of the celebrity nude photo shoots making news. Madonna, Joan Collins, Terry Moore, Roxy Pulitzer, and even the embarrassing Penthouse release of nude photos taken of Vanessa Williams (the photos themselves were not embarrassing. I bought that issue, and found them quite complimentary to her. It was the timing of the release, as Vanessa was the first African American Miss America at the time..).
I had also found on the book racks of a News stand, a copy of Philip Jose farmer's A Feast Unknown.. A rather adult book, with depictions of explicit sexuality...
I had, by this time, seen a couple of edited and abbreviated x rated films in a drive -in. When my best friend got engaged, he gave me his stash of Hustler and Club magazines (which were NOT known for their written pieces..)  On the occasion of my best friend's Bachelor party, I was exposed to eight hours of x rated videos, which turned me off such films for a long time.
Having amassed such a large collection, I felt I had no need to continue to further collect such magazines.
I would fall in love, contemplate marriage, and throw away most of the collection, keeping only a sparse few of my favorites. Of course, the 'falling in love' thing didn't work out as well as I had hoped... Still, at the time I was dating, and doing the bar scenes, and later, singles dances. I didn't feel much need to start collecting again...
And then, I got my first modern PC...
Even then, back in 2000, the internet was notorious for two things: pornography sites, and the computer viruses that you'd be at risk for visiting those sites. It was the 'wild west' days of an unfiltered new medium that did even more than the VHS revolution to bring pornography out of slattern theaters filled with men in trench coats, and into the home... yet, I wasn't much interested.
There were the notorious sex videos floating around. And law suits over nude photos circulating the web (though why Alyssa Milano sued over such photos, when she already did a full frontal nude appearance on a cable TV show, is a mystery to me..). Not really stimulating my libido as much as the otherwise R rated photos appearing in magazines like Stuff, FHM & Maxim...
What did catch my attention was the new era of globalization, and the new ideas I'd been exposed to...
 While I was re-immersing myself in the culture of comic book collecting, and reading up on Anime and Manga, I'd keep hearing this elusive term: Hentai.
adult anime, comics or games"- In Japanese, the word hentai is not really a nice word, as it means "sexual pervert." In English, fans started using it as a catchall to describe all adult Japanese anime, games and comics
Now, I knew about the American traditions of underground comics, even bought issues of Heavy Metal for it's racy content... But, what I was hearing about Hentai made it sound so... implausible! I was learning that the aseptic, polite society of Japan that I had long been told of, had a very dark subconscious...
So, yes, I started to investigate a bit.. I sampled some milder XXX sites, downloaded some rather interesting photos that included bondage, and Hentai parodies of Anime characters. But, I got bored again....
And then, I learned about the Suicide Girls... To me, this concept of the models actually contributing their own photos, of controlling their own content seemed an intriguing twist on post-feminist sexuality.. Already, Feminist Susan Faludi had commented on how the modern pornography industry favored women over men.. And the Suicide Girls photos seemed that much more natural and unforced than the supposedly impromptu Girls Gone Wild videos. The emphasis on a Riot Grrl aesthetic, opposing the 'girl next door' imagery of typical pornography, made it seem more revolutionary...
It cannot be denied that the incredible expansion of the Internet was due mostly to two factors: the need for people to gamble, and the need for people to see each other naked. But, what is most interesting are the little things along the way that happened because of that...

No comments:

Post a Comment